Kim Lajoie's blog

The importance of physical proximity

by Kim Lajoie on March 11, 2015

Let’s talk about being close with your artist. Like, really close. Like in the same room together. I recently had a couple of interesting experiences. One of my previous artists approached me to produce her next release. We’d worked together before, and it’s been one of the best working relationships I’d had with an artist. […]

How not to be a producer

by Kim Lajoie on February 14, 2015

So, I came across this gem last night. And isn’t it just amazing. This is an excellent example of how not to be a producer. The producer and the singer are meant to be collaborating on writing a new song and demonstrate Ableton Push. They hadn’t met each other prior to the session, and they […]

You don’t need contracts. You need trust.

by Kim Lajoie on March 17, 2014

I recently participated in an interesting discussion. A junior producer was working with a band on a recording and the band left partway through the project to do their recording elsewhere. And they didn’t pay. In the vernacular, the junior producer got stiffed. A couple of other people in the discussion suggested that an adequate […]

The two things I do that make almost every artist pleased with my first mix revision

by Kim Lajoie on December 30, 2013

If you’re reading this blog, you probably do some mixing. Chances are, you sometimes mix other people’s music too – whether you recorded it yourself or not. If this is you, you’ve probably experienced dreaded ‘mix revisions’. You think you’re finished, but then the artist comes back for just one more thing. And another. And […]

Sometimes it’s better to wait

by Kim Lajoie on December 23, 2013

This post was originally published on Zencha Music. I recently had an interesting experience recording a song. The artist – who I’d worked with in the past and had seen play live several times – was dragging the song. And not just a little bit. It was dragging a lot. It was a completely different […]

Not all hired help is the same – why ‘who you know’ really is so important

by Kim Lajoie on August 29, 2013

At some point in your travels, you’ll come across a situation that requires more than you can handle. Maybe you need a session guitarist. Maybe your project requires mixing or mastering at a higher standard than you can deliver. Maybe you need a great singer. Maybe you need to hire a bigger studio (and a […]

How (not) to take the pressure off your vocal recording session

by Kim Lajoie on August 7, 2013

Björgvin Benediktsson: Sneak in a vocal session at random times. Some interesting advice here, although I think it reflects a sense of helplessness on the part of the producer. One of the most important roles of a producer is to get the best performances out of the musicians on the session. I’m of the firm […]

A closer relationship with your client (or: The Unlikely Advantages of Recording in Your Control Room)

by Kim Lajoie on July 17, 2013

Björgvin Benediktsson: Even if you don’t produce music yourself, recording an artist in the same room as you can create a more intimate relationship if you are trying to get a good performance from them. I’m not saying you should breathe down the singer’s neck, but being in the same room creates easier communication. It’s […]

You also have to do the other kind of listening

by Kim Lajoie on July 10, 2013

This post was originally published on Audio-Issues. As an engineer or producer, you have to do a lot of different kinds of listening. You have to listen carefully to the raw sounds that your microphones are capturing. You have to listen to the balance of sounds when you mix. You have to listen to reference […]

Artists have to believe in the process in order to believe in the results

by Kim Lajoie on July 7, 2013

People are interesting creatures. Often we don’t know something. That’s not so bad, because we can go look it up and educate ourselves. But it’s much worse when we don’t know that we don’t know something. The worst form of that is when we think we know something, but we actually don’t. That false confidence […]