Kim Lajoie's blog

The secret to full-sounding mixes

by Kim Lajoie on March 1, 2010

This applies to all the composer+producer+engineer types out there… Have you ever felt like your mixes were empty? That they sound a bit incomplete? Perhaps you’ve compared your music to your favourite commercial references and realised that they somehow sounded thicker and fuller? You’ve got all the obvious parts in your mix – kick, bass, […]

Five secrets to making your mix louder

by Kim Lajoie on February 22, 2010

Don’t dismiss this post yet! Even if you’re in the ‘more dynamics’ brigade, these tips will give you clearer mixes that suffer less in mastering. That means better-preserved dynamics and higher fidelity! For those of you who really do want your mixs SUPER LOUD, this tips will let you push more volume without your sound […]

How do individual tracks sound on their own before they’re mixed?

by Kim Lajoie on December 10, 2009

When mixing, there are two different approaches to take when processing individual tracks (channels, instruments, sounds, etc) – Try to make the track sound as ‘good’ as possible on its own, and then fit it into the mix; and Pay no attention to the integrity of the track’s individual sound and ruthlessly filter and EQ […]

Alternatives to reverb

by Kim Lajoie on August 14, 2009

Reverb adds two properties to sounds – diffusion and depth. While there are many ways of changing the balance between diffusion and depth, there are times when a more extreme approach is required. Reverb may not be the best solution if a sound needs a lot of diffusion but very little depth, or a lot […]

Mixing with multiple reverbs

by Kim Lajoie on August 13, 2009

One way to contruct a subtle and complex ambience in a mix is to combine two different approaches to reverb. Going about this in an informed, deliberate way will result in a much more refined and appropriate sound than by simply stacking two different reverb algorithms (either in parallel or – heaven forbid – serial). […]

The case against compressed drums (articulation vs texture)

by Kim Lajoie on August 12, 2009

Don’t overcompress those drums! When drums are compressed, the body of the drums is brought up in level (relative to the transient). This creates the perception of longer sustain, making the drums sound bigger. By bringing up the level of the audio between the transients, there is more sound overall. This makes the drums sound […]

Mixing with reverb 3

by Kim Lajoie on August 10, 2009

Does it need short reverb or long reverb? Should the mix be lush or dry? Then start to ask the more difficult questions – Should be ambience be deep or shallow? Should it be natural or unnatural? Short / Long: Obviously, you’ll need to adjust the reverb time. That’s not all though – other parameters […]

Mixing with reverb 2

by Kim Lajoie on August 6, 2009

Does it need short reverb or long reverb? Should the mix be lush or dry? Then start to ask the more difficult questions – Should be ambience be deep or shallow? Should it be natural or unnatural? The answers to these questions should be based on the song. Short / Long: This decision should primarily […]

Approaching mixing

by Kim Lajoie on May 7, 2009

Often there’s quite some discussion about understanding individual techniques or dealing with particular sounds in mixing – how to use compression, how to process drums, how to saturate bass, etc. While an understanding of techniques is essential, it’s just as important to see the bigger picture – how to fit it all together, how to […]